Yellowstone includes the world’s largest collection of geysers, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, numerous waterfalls, and great herds of wildlife.

Friday, February 28, 2014

When to Visit

Sometimes the small things are the big things

Except for the Mammoth – Tower Road, the roads are closed from November through March or longer. During this time the average temperature is November 13-39, December 2-32, January 1-29, February 3-34, March 1-40, and April 22-49.  Therefore, the outer limits for our visit are May through October,’'











Month Roads Open Visitors Bear, Black and Grizzly Bighorn Sheep Bison Coyotes Elk Moose & Mule Deer Prong-horn
April
de
22-49 degrees
Apr 26
W.Entr> Madison >Old Faithful & Mammoth
27,139

.96% of total annual visitors
March to early May: emerge from den and move toward lower elevations Calves born (Mated in Jan). Pups born Begin to migrate when snow melt begins
May

31-61 degrees
Teton Rd opens

My 3 E. Entr > Fishing Bridge & Canyon
198,780

7.06% of total annual visitors
Forage in lower elevation & mate Lambs born Calves born Pups born Calves born late May. Mammoth campground is one the preferred sites Calves & fawns born Fawns born
June

38-71 degrees

Flowers bloom
Early June or late May Tower > Canyon & Old Faithful > W. Thumb 516,577

18.36% of total annual visitors
Forge in lower elevations but begin to move to high elevations; mate Lambs born Pups leave den (8-10 weeks old) Calves & fawns born Fawns born
July

42-81 degrees
758,790

26.97% of total annual visitors
Mate Rut mid-July Pups leave den (8-10 weeks old)
August

40-79 degrees
391.648

23.95% of total annual visitors
Rut Pups leave den (8-10 weeks old)
Sept

40-79 degrees

Fall colors begin mid-Sept
391,648

13.92% of total annual visitors
Rut Rut mid-Sept
Oct

32-69 degrees
128,815

4.56% of total annual visitorts
Begin to move to den (Rut from Nov – Dec) Pups start to hunt on their own Rut (Some migrate in Nov)

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Grand Loop

Mapfinal

 

North Entrance to Mammoth Hot Springs

Elk reside in the area, sometimes giving birth in Mammoth or at the campgrounds. The most prominent site is Mammoth Terraces.

Mammoth sites: ~ Mammoth Hotel ~ Mammoth Hot Springs ~ Mammoth Visitor Center ~
Mammoth Campground

Mammoth Hot Springs to Norris

Between Mammoth Hot Springs and Norris, just after Golden Gate rim, Salt Lake Flats, with grizzly bears, black bears, gray wolves, buffalo, elk, birds and much more.

Norris area includes: Golden Gate - Sheepeater Cliff - Obsidian Cliff - Roaring Mountain - Norris Geyser Basin ~ Norris Campground ~ Roaring Mountain ~ Gibbon Falls

Norris to Canyon Village

Cygnet Lakes Trail. Distance: 8 miles. This trail travels through burned lodgepole pine forest and past small marshy ephemeral ponds to meadows surrounding Cygnet Lakes. Day use only! Trailhead: Pullout on south side of Norris-Canyon road approximately 5.5 miles west of Canyon Junction.

Ice Lake Trail. 0.3 miles. Ice Lake is a small lake nestled in a lodgepole pine forest. Trailhead: 3.5 miles east of Norris on the Norris-Canyon road.

Grebe Lake: Distance, round trip: 6 miles. Estimated time: 3–4 hours. Trailhead: 31⁄2 miles west of Canyon Junction on the Norris– Canyon Road. The trail follows an old fire road through meadows and forest, some of which burned in 1988. At the lake you can connect with the Howard Eaton Trail or return the way you came.

Cascade Lake (11) • Round trip 5 miles, 3 hours. Choose from two trailheads for this easy hike: • Cascade Lake trailhead, 1.25 miles (2 km) north of Canyon Junction on the Grand Loop Road • Cascade Creek trailhead, 0.25 miles west of Canyon Junction on the Canyon–Norris Road the Cascade Lake trail joins the Cascade Creek trail after 1.2 miles. if you begin on this trail, remember to bear left on your return trip. Either way, you will hike through forest and meadow to a lake. This walk allows people with limited time to enjoy open meadows where wildflowers abound and wildlife is often seen. The trail can be wet and muddy through July with many biting insects.

Howard Eaton Trail. (to Cascade, Grebe, Wolf, and Ice lakes, and Norris)
Distance, one way: 2.5–12 miles, depending on destination. Estimated time: 3–8 hours, depending on destination Trailhead: pullout 1⁄4 mile west of Canyon Junction on the Norris– Canyon Road. Choose your destination on this trail that passes through forest, meadow, and marsh: Cascade Lake 21⁄2 mi, Grebe Lake 41⁄4 mi, Wolf Lake 61⁄4 mi, Ice Lake 81⁄4 mi, and Norris Campground 12 mi. The trail can be wet and muddy through July with many biting insects.

Canyon sites include: ~ Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone ~ North Rim Drive ~ South Rim Drive ~ Uncle Tom's Trail ~ Brink of the Upper Falls ~ Brink of the Lower Falls ~ Artist Point

Canyon Village to Fishing Bridge

This is the road through Hayden Valley, known for wildlife. The Hayden Valley is located six miles north of Fishing Bridge Junction. The Pelican Valley is situated three miles east of Fishing Bridge. These two vast valleys comprise some of the best habitat in the lower 48 states for grizzly bears, bison, elk, and other wildlife species.

Clear Lake/Ribbon Lake Loop (10) • Round trip 3 to 6 miles. Start at Wapiti trail- head on South Rim drive to Artist Point 2.0 miles south of Canyon Junction on the Grand Loop Road. this relatively level trail winds through meadows and forest and passes by three lovely backcountry lakes. You can hike the en- tire loop 6.0 miles, or you can turn around at Clear Lake 3.0 miles round trip, or Lily Pad Lake 4.0 miles round trip. Caution: Clear Lake is a hydrothermal area.

Howard Eaton Distance, round trip: 7 miles, 21⁄2–31⁄2 hours. Trailhead: Parking lot on east side of the Fishing Bridge.

Sites included: Hayden Valley (includes LeHardy Rapids ~ Mud Volcano Area) - Artist's Point - Inspiration Point

Fishing Bridge to East Entrance

Pelican Creek (8) • Round trip 1.3 miles. Starting at the west end of Pelican Creek bridge, 1.0 mile east of the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center, this easy trail travels through forest and along the lakeshore.This short but diverse trail travels through the forest to the lakeshore before looping back to the trailhead. It is a scenic introduction to a variety of Yellowstone’s habitats and is a good place for birding.

Storm Point (9) • Round trip 2.3 miles. Starting at a large turnout at Indian Pond, 3 miles east of the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center, this level loop crosses meadow and forest before reaching the tip of Storm Point, with expansive views of Yellowstone Lake and surrounding mountains. the trail continues along the lakeshore and through a lodgepole pine forest before rejoining the road. This trail begins in the open meadows overlooking Indian Pond and Yellowstone Lake. It passes alongside the pond before turning right (west) into the forest. The trail continues through the trees and out to scenic, wind-swept Storm Point. The rocky area near the point is home to a large colony of yellow-bellied marmots. Following the shoreline to the west, the trail eventually loops back through the lodgepole forest and returns to Indian Pond. Often closed in late spring and early summer due to bear activity. Inquire at the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center about trail closures before hiking.

Pelican Valley Distance, round trip: 6.8 miles, 4–5 hours. Trailhead: Turn onto the gravel road across from Indian Pond, 3 miles east of Fishing Bridge Visitor Center; park at end of road. You are entering some of the best grizzly country in the lower 48 states. The trail heads north, crosses a few bridges through a meadow, then enters the forest. After it leaves the forest, it ascends a small hill to a nice overlook of the valley, with the creek below and the Absaroka Mountains to the east. From here, the trail turns slightly to the right (east) and passes through a small hydrothermal area. Stay on the trail through this fragile and hazardous area. Soon, the trail veers north (left), crosses a small creek, and climbs up a cutbank. This is a good place to enjoy the views of Pelican Creek. One mile farther, the trail reaches a washed-out bridge. Beyond here the trail continues into Yellowstone’s vast backcountry. The dayhike stops here; return by the same route. Many restrictions apply to this trail because it is in prime grizzly bear habitat: • Closed until July 4th • Day-use only, 9 am–7 pm • Groups of four or more hikers recommended. Off-trail travel prohibited on the first 2.5 miles.

Shoshone Lake (4) (via DeLacy Creek) • Round trip 6 miles. Starting at a trailhead sign at deLacy Creek, 8.8 miles west of West thumb junction, the trail runs along the forest edge and through open meadows to the shores of Yellowstone’s largest backcountry lake. Moose are seen here occasionally.Hike along a forest’s edge and through open meadows to the shores of Yellowstone’s largest backcountry lake. Look for sandhill cranes in meadows, moose near shore, and water birds on and near the lake. Beyond here the trail continues into Yellowstone’s vast backcountry. The dayhike stops here; return by the same route


Fishing Bridge to Lake Village to Bay Bridge to West Thumb

Bears prey on the cutthroat trout from early May through mid August; however, greatest use occurs during the months of June and July.

Lake area includes: Fishing Bridge ~ Bridge Bay Marina ~ Bridge Bay Campground ~ Lake Village ~ Lake Lodge ~ Lake Yellowstone Hotel ~ Sedge Bay ~ Mary Bay ~ Steamboat Point

West Thumb to Grant Village to South Entrance

Riddle Lake (6) • Round trip 5 miles. The trailhead is about 3.0 miles south of Grant Village junction, just south of the Continental divide sign. this fairly level trail crosses the Continental divide and runs through forest and marshy meadows to the shores of a little lake. Bear management area: Trail usually opens July 15. Opening may be later if trumpeter swans are nesting on the lake.Look for elk in the meadows and for birds near the lake. Travel in groups of four or more people is recommended, but not required.

Natural Bridge. Trailhead: Bridge Bay Marina parking lot near the campground entrance road.
The natural bridge is a 51 foot cliff of rhyolite rock cut through by Bridge Creek. The hiking trail meanders through the forest for 1⁄4 mile. It then joins a service road and continues to the right (west) for 1 mile to the Natural Bridge. The short but steep switchback trail to the top of the bridge starts in front of the interpretive exhibit. To protect this fragile resource, the top of the bridge is closed to hiking. Above the natural bridge, the trail crosses the creek through a narrow ravine and then continues along the cliff before rejoining the road. Exercise caution when crossing the ravine. Trail closed until early summer while bears feed on spawning trout in Bridge Creek. Inquire at the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center for opening date and other closures.

Old Faithful to Madison

Fairy Falls (1) • Round trip 5 or 7 miles, 8 or 11.2 km, easy. Fairy Falls, 200 feet high, is one of Yellowstone’s most spectacular waterfalls. Choose from two routes: Shorter route: Park 1.0 mi south of Midway Geyser Basin, cross steel bridge, walk 1.0 mi to the trailhead. Longer route: Park at the end of Fountain Flat drive and walk 1.75 mi to the trailhead. From the trailhead, walk 1.6 miles through a young lodgepole pine forest to the falls. You can continue 0.6 miles to Spray and Imperial geysers. this adds 1.2 miles to the hike. Bear management area: Trail opens in late May.

Lone Star Geyser (3) • Round trip 4.8 miles. the trailhead is east of Kepler Cascades pullout 3.5 miles southeast of Old Faithful overpass on Grand Loop Road. this level trail and bicycle path follows the Firehole River to the geyser. Lone Star erupts 30–45 feet about every three hours. If you witness an eruption, please note the time and report it at the Old Faithful Visitor Education Center.

Geyser Hill Old Faithful to Morning Glory

Old Faithful area includes: Old Faithful Inn ~ Old Faithful Geyser ~ Old Faithful Lodge ~ Upper Geyser Basin ~ Old Faithful Visitor Center ~ Old Faithful Snow Lodge ~ Geyser Row (Black Sand Geyser Basin, Biscuit Geyser Basin, Midway Geyser Basin, Lower Geyser Basin)


Madison to West Entrance

Harlequin Lake (21) • Round trip 1 mile. Park at the third pullout 1.5 miles west of west entrance junction on Madison road.

Two Ribbons Trail. 1.5 miles roundtrip. This is a boardwalk that winds through burned lodgepole pine and sagebrush communities next to the Madison River. Good examples of fire recovery and regrowth as well as buffalo wallows. There are no interpretive signs or brochures other than the wayside exhibits at the trailheads. Trailhead: Approximately 5 miles east of the West Entrance, no marked trailhead, look for wayside exhibits next to boardwalk in large pull-outs


Madison to Norris

Artists Paintpots. 1 mile roundtrip. The trail winds across a wet meadow on boardwalk then enters a partially burned lodgepole pine forest. The thermal area within the short loop at the end of the trail contains some of the most colorful hot springs and small geysers found in the area. Two mudpots at the top of the hill allow closer access than Fountain Paint Pots. Caution for flying mud! Trailhead: 4.5 miles south of Norris on the Norris-Madison road. Easy with one steep uphill/downhill section, trail erodes easily so may be rutted after rains

Madison area includes: Firehole River Drive ~ Madison Campground ~ Madison Canyon ~ Madison River

Canyon Village to Tower-Roosevelt

Mount Washburn (10,243 feet) is between Tower and Canyon, and the drive's highest point is Dunraven Pass (8,859. Dunraven is the highest road pass in Yellowstone and is a great place to see grizzly bears, bighorn sheep, wildflowers, and a host of other amazing wildlife.

Mammoth Hot Springs to Tower-Roosevelt

Wraith Falls (15) • Round trip 1.0 mile. The trail begins at a pullout 0.5 miles east of Lava Creek Picnic Area on the Grand Loop Road. The trail passes through sagebrush meadows, marshland, and mixed conifer forest to the base of 79-foot Wraith Falls on Lupine Creek.

Tower-Roosevelt sites: ~ Roosevelt Lodge ~ Tower Fall ~ Calcite Springs ~ Tower Campground

Tower-Roosevelt to Northeast Entrance

Lamar Valley is between Tower-Roosevelt and the northeast entrance. During the summer months, it is teeming with wildlife (black bears, bighorn sheep, elk, bison, coyotes, osprey, bald eagles, moose, pronghorn, and the largest concentration of grey wolves and grizzlies in the park). The valley is an open space with the Lamar River and views of distant mountain peaks. The total length of the road between Roosevelt and the Northeast Entrance is 29 miles, and is the only road in the park that's open all year.

Friday, February 14, 2014

WIldlife - Where to Find

Map of Yellowstone Wildlife

SandCranes_Flying_Isenberg_20100102_0065

Wildlife

We reviewed the list of mammals at Yellowstone and Grand Teton and made up a list of possible animals that we would like to photograph. There are other animals, such as mountain goats, white-tail deer, wolves, red fox, mountain lions, lynx, and bob cats that we would like to see. However, viewing them is more uncommon so we won't plan around seeing them. The animals that we're going to try to photograph are black bears, grizzly bears, bighorn sheep, bison, coyote, elk, moose, mule deer, and pronghorn. It's feasible that we'll be able to photograph pups, cubs, and calves in the spring. And, the summer-fall rut of bison, elk, moose, mule deer, and pronghorn.

Bears, black: Black bears are active during daylight, dawn, and dusk. Look for black bears in small openings within or near forested areas. Black bears are most commonly observed on the northern portion of the park along the road corridor from Elk Creek to Tower Falls, and from Mammoth Hot Springs north to Indian Creek. Black bears are also commonly observed in the Bechler region in the southwest corner of the park. Prey on the cutthroat trout from early May through mid August; however, primarily during the months of June and July. Look for black bears along the edges of trees in the Lamar and Hayden valleys, or among the trees near Mammoth and Tower. Cascade Canyon, Two Ocean Lake area, Lizard Creek area. Both black and grizzlies are seen all over the park. Your best bet for seeing both in the summer is Tower, the Lamar Valley, Hayden Valley and the are around Fishing Bridge and Sylvan Pass. In mid to late fall, Dunraven Pass is almost a sure thing. In the spring, the Lamar and Hayden valley's are good places. * In August and early September, the Moose-Wilson Road is pretty reliable for black bears, as they come to feast on the tasty hawthorn berries. The bruins are so fixated on gorging themselves that they pretty much ignore the cars on the road. Just remember that they're wild bears and keep your distance.

Bears, grizzly: Grizzly bears are most commonly observed in Lamar Valley, Gardiners Hole, Antelope Creek meadows, Dunraven Pass, Hayden Valley, and in the wet meadows along the East Entrance Road from Fishing Bridge to the East Entrance of the park. They are found in open meadows and are active night, dawn, and dusk.Prey on the cutthroat trout from early May through mid August; however, primarily during the months of June and July. Cascade Canyon, Two Ocean Lake area, Lizard Creek area. Both black and grizzlies are seen all over the park. Your best bet for seeing both in the summer is Tower, the Lamar Valley, Hayden Valley and the are around Fishing Bridge and Sylvan Pass. In mid to late fall, Dunraven Pass is almost a sure thing. In the spring, the Lamar and Hayden valley's are good places.

Bighorn sheep: Look for them in the canyon between Mammoth Hot Springs and the North Entrance, the cliffs near Tower Fall, and on the slopes of Mount Washburn. Tower, Sylvan Pass, Soda Butte.

Bison: They graze in open areas throughout the park. See them year-round at Hayden and Lamar valleys, summer at grasslands of the park, and winter at hydrothermal areas and along the Madison River. Sagebrush flats from Gros Ventre to north entrance. Easily seen all over the park, in any area. The highest concentrations are in the Lamar and Hayden valleys. Bison congregate in the fields that wrap Mormon Row, as well as in the pastures on the east side of U.S. 191/26/89 just south of Moran Junction.

Coyote: Most likely to see in grassy areas. All over Grand Teton park. Easily seen all over the park, especially Hayden and Lamar Valleys.

Elk: Best time to look for them us just after dawn and sunset. Jenny Lake entrance, NE entrance near Snake River, Two Ocean Lake. Norris, Madison, Hayden, Lamar, Tower, Mammoth, Canyon. Some are born in the Mammoth campground.

Moose: They browse aquatic plants and willows, so look along creek and rivers—especially around Yellowstone Lake, the Northeast Entrance, and the East Entrance. Moose are commonly observed in the park's southwestern corner along the Bechler and Falls rivers, in the riparian zones around Yellowstone Lake, in the Soda Butte Creek, Pelican Creek, Lewis River, and Gallatin river drainages, and in the Willow Park area between Mammoth and Norris. Summer moose migrations from south and west of the park into Yellowstone have been confirmed. At Oxbow Bend, Two Ocean Lake area, Gros Ventre area. Soda Butte, Hayden, Canyon, Bridge Bay, Lewis Lake. Moose are often seen early in the morning and in the evening in Willow Flats right behind Jackson Lake Lodge, and I've even seen them browsing in ponds that pool along Cascade Creek up above Inspiration Point. They also like to browse along the Snake River in the area of Oxbow Bend.

Mountain goats: NE corner of the park near Cooke City, mountains in the Slough Creek drainage, Beartooth Pass (outside the park).

Mule deer live throughout the park. They are easier to see in the grasslands; but they may surprise you as they emerge from the forests too. All over Grand Tetons, including Ocean Lake area, Gros Ventre area.

Pronghorn: pronghorn live in the northern part of the park, where they browse plants in the open grasslands. They are built to run, and that is how they elude predators. Look for them around the North Entrance, and along the road from Mammoth Hot Springs through the Lamar Valley. East of Jenny Lake Entrance. Easily seen all over the northern half of the park, especially around Tower and the Lamar Valley.

Wolves: most active at dawn and desk and are most concentrated in the Lamar Valley. Hayden Valley, Lamar Valley, northside of Dunraven Pass near Tower. Bring binoculars or a spotting scope. and Lamar valleys, summer at grasslands of the park, and winter at hydrothermal areas and along the Madison River. Sagebrush flats from Gros Ventre to north entrance. Easily seen all over the park, in any area. The highest concentrations are in the Lamar and Hayden valleys. Bison congregate in the fields that wrap Mormon Row, as well as in the pastures on the east side of U.S. 191/26/89 just south of Moran Junction

Friday, February 7, 2014

Scenic Drives

 

Wyoming Centennial Scenic Byway, Hwy 287 (Dubois) to Moran to Hwy 191/26 Jackson to Hwy 191 Pinedale

This 162 mile route winds through the mountains and river valleys, passing the Tetons, the Snake River, and the Wind River Range. HIghlights include the National Elk Refuge in Jackson It takes about four hours to go.  The best time is spring through fall. This drive is listed in the National Geographic book “Drives of a Lifetime: 500 of the Word’s Most Spectacular Trips,”

Highway 212, Beartooth Scenic Byway, was called the "most scenic drive in America" by Charles Kuralt.
Location: begins at the northeast entrance to Yellowstone and ends at Red Lodge, Montana.
Time: From Canyon Campground, it is approximately 122 miles, 3 1/2 hours, one way
Terrain: It includes views of snow covered mountains, ponds, and lakes. It goes through grassy hills, wildflower meadows forests, mountains, over peaks, nad through switchbacks that end at vista points  It's 68 miles, takes about three hours.and the elevation goes from 7500' to 10,947' to 6,400'. Goes through lush forests, alpine meadows;past glaciers and lakes, and mountain peaks.
Wildlife: teaming with wildlife, including mountain giants that may be near the road.

This drive is listed in the National Geographic book “Drives of a Lifetime: 500 of the Word’s Most Spectacular Trips,” which states that the “aspens are glorious in late September.” It also states that the excursion to the Chief Joseph Scenic Highway offers stunning views of the Beartooth Peak and Yellowstone River.

The exact opening and closing dates very, but it is usually open from Memorial Day to October, with some one day closures in June due to snow. 

Beartooth Highway (Highway 212): Yellowstone NE Entrance to Cook City

Beartooth Highway (Highway 212) Cooke City to Red Lodge Part 1 of 2

Beartooth Highway (Highway 212) Cooke City to Red Lodge Part 2 of 2

scencdriveshwy

Highway 14/16/29, The Buffalo Bill Cody North Fork Scenic Byway
Location: follows the North Fork of the Shoshone River through Wapiti Valley to the East Entrance of Yellowstone National Park. It start about 25 miles west of Cody at the Shoshone National Forest border
Distance 27 miles, paved
Dates: The road is open year round, but the The East Entrance to Yellowstone opens around May 3 and closes in November.
Time: Normal driving time from the forest boundary to the Park is approximately 45 minutes.

Buffalo Bill North Fork Highway 14 Cody to Yellowstone East Entrance Part 2 of this video is not available in the US.

Buffalo Bill North Fork Highway 14 Cody towards Yellowstone East Entrance

Wyoming Highway 291, also known as the South Fork Road,
Location: from Yellowstone Avenue in Cody to the foot of the mountains. It run through South Fork, along the South Fork of the Shoshone River.
Distance: 84 miles
Time: It takes approximately two and 1/2 hours round trip.
Wildlife: moose, pronghorn antelope, elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, foxes, and raptors like hawks and eagles.

Yellowstone Loop

YellowstoneRoads

interactive Yellowstone NPS Map

2014 Road Openings
April 18: Mammoth to Old Faithful; Madison to West Entrance; Norris to Canyon.
May 2: Canyon to Lake; Lake to East Entrance (Lake is one mile south of Fishing Bridge).
May 9: Lake to South Entrance; West Thumb to Old Faithful (Craig Pass); Tower to Tower Fall.
May 23: Tower Fall to Canyon (Dunraven Pass); Beartooth Highway.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Where to Camp

In addition to the campgrounds within the parks, outside of the parks, there are state, federal forest sites, and private campsites. Some of the sites never fill; however, they might be inconvenient and have less amenities.

The national park website (http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/campgrounds-outside-yellowstone.htm) lists additional campgrounds that are outside of the park.

http://www.forestcamping.com/dow/list/nflist.htm lists and describes national forest campgrounds.

Yellowstone

From July 1 through the first Monday in September, camping at Yellowstone is limited to fourteen days. To maximize our stay, we made reservations for the month of June at Canyon campground. Yellowstone begins making reservations over a year in advance! They also have sites that cannot be reserved in advance.

West of Yellowstone

Highway 20 rest stop: 38.6 miles (3/4 hours) west of Madison, Yellowstone

North of the Mammoth Entrance

Rocky Mountain CG (877) 534-6931; .5 miles from North Entrance in Gardiner, on Jardine Road

Yellowstone RV Park (406) 848-7496; 2 miles N on Hwy 8

Highway 89 rest stop: 28.5 (1/2 hour) north of Mammoth, Yellowstone


Beartooth Highway - Red Lodge, Montana

Perry’s RV Park and Campground $20 per night. (406) 446-2722; contact@perrysrv.us

KOA (800) 562-7540 redlodgekoa@hotmail.com about $30 per night

beartoothCampgrunds
Basin National Forest Campground
1 mile south of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 7 miles west on Forest Road 71
28 Sites, Trailers up to 22 ft. $15/ night minimum 2 nights
From US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway), go to the south end of Red Lodge, MT. Turn west on West Fork Rock Creek Road (Forest Road 2071). Go approximately 7 miles to campground entrance on right
Basin Campground is located 7 miles west of Red Lodge, Montana, along Forest Road 2071, which is paved all the way to the campground. The area is a popular location for hiking, backpacking and fishing.
The campground is situated on the banks of the West Fork of Rock Creek. The campground and the area surrounding the campground were burned by the Cascade Fire in 2008, leaving an open landscape abounding with wildflowers.
Open mid-May to the end of September

Cascade National Forest Campground
2 miles south of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 10 miles west on Forest Road 71
30 Sites, Trailers up to 32 ft. $10 per night, minimum 2 nights. Wildlife viewing.
From US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway), go to the south end of Red Lodge, MT. Turn west on West Fork Rock Creek Road (Forest Road 2071). Go approximately 10 miles to campground entrance on left
Open June 2 to September 5

Limber Pine National Forest Campground
12 miles SW of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 1 miles SW on 421
13 Sites, Trailers up to 22 ft. $15/ night, minimum 2 nights
Travel 11 miles southwest of Red Lodge, MT on US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway). Turn right on Rock Creek Road (Forest Road 2421). Go 1.2 miles, campground entrance on left.
Open mid May to Labor

Parkside National Forest Campground
12 miles SW of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 1 mile SW on 421
25 Sites, Trailers up to 22 ft. $15/ night, minimum 2 nights
Travel 11 miles southwest of Red Lodge, MT on US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway). Turn right on Rock Creek Road (Forest Road 2421). Go 0.3 miles, campground entrance on right.
Open mid May to the end of September

Ratine National Forest Campground
5 miles SW of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 3 miles SW on Forest Road 379
8 Sites, Trailers up to 22 ft. $14/night
Travel 7 miles southwest of Red Lodge, MT on US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway). Turn left on East Side Road (Forest Road 2379). Go 0.5 miles to campground entrance on the left.
Open May 12 to September 26

Sheridan National Forest Campground
5 miles SW of Red Lodge on Hwy 212, 2 miles SW on Forest Road 379
8 Sites, Trailers up to 22 ft. $14/ night
Travel 5 miles southwest of Red Lodge, MT on US Hwy 212 (Beartooth Scenic Byway). Turn left on East Side Road (Forest Road 2379). Go 2 miles to campground entrance on the right.
Open May 19 to September 5

East of Yellowstone

Buffalo Bill State Park: at the apex of the North and South Fork of the Shoshone River, Cody
tel:(307) 587-9227 $17 per night

Grand Teton

Grand Teton
campsites cannot be reserved in advance.

Teton Range Resort is the site near the Tetons that looks most promising. In May it is $20 a night, including 20 amps power and per the vendor, reservations should not be necessary. In August, the rate increases and be the vendor, reservations may be necessary. http://www.yellowstonerv.com

Friday, January 31, 2014

Walks ande Videos in the Park

YouTube Yellowstone Play List

NW Mammoth Hot Springs Quadrant

YouTube: NPS: The Upper Road (15:01)

Per NOS, "Wraith Falls
This short, easy hike through open sagebrush and Douglas-fir forest to the foot of Wraith Falls cascade on Lupine Creek.
Trailhead: Pullout ¼ mile east of Lava Creek Picnic area on the Mammoth-Tower Roar
Distance: 1 mile (1 km) round trip
Level of Difficulty: Easy"

Lower Terrace 1M
1.5 miles. 200' elevation change.

YouTube: NPS Mammoth Hot Springs (1:41)

Artist Paint Pots 1L
1.2 miles. 80' elevation change. Geysers.
Per NPS, Trail winds across a wet meadow on boardwalk then enters a partially burned lodgepole pine forest. The thermal area within the short loop at the end of the trail contains some of the most colorful hot springs and small geysers found in the area. Two mudpots at the top of the hill allow closer access than Fountain Paint Pots.
Easy with one steep uphill/downhill section, trail erodes easily so may be rutted after rains.

YouTube: NPS: Artists Paint Pots (2:28)

Grizzly Lake 1L
3.6 miles. 0' elevation change.

Ice Lake Trail 1L
4.5 miles. 30' elevation change. Waterfall.
Ice Lake is a small lake in the thick lodgepole pine forest.
Per NPS, "Ice Lake is a lovely, small lake nestled in the thick lodgepole pine forest. Some of the area was heavily burned in 1988. Hikers can continue from Ice Lake to Wolf Lake, Grebe Lake, and Cascade Lake, and then on to Canyon.
Trailhead: 3.5 miles east of Norris on the Norris-Canyon road
Distance: 0.3 miles (0.5 km)
Level of Difficulty: Easy, handicapped accessible backcountry site on lake, may need assistance to reach lake due to some terrain level change"

Bacon Rind Creek 1M
4.2 miles. 200' elevation change. Wildlife viewing.

Fan Creek 1M
5-11 miles. 200' elevation change. Wildlife is viewing.

Boiling River 1L
1.0 miles. 0' elevation change.

Bunsen Peak 1L
1.0 miles. 1,320' elevation change. Notable view.

Beaver Ponds 1M
5.1 miles. 350' elevation change. Flowers.
Per NPS, "The trail follows the creek up Clematis Gulch, climbing 350 feet through Douglas-fir trees. The beaver ponds are reached after hiking 2.5 miles through open meadows of sagebrush and stands of aspen. Elk, mule deer, pronghorn, moose, beaver dams and lodges, and the occasional beaver and black bear may be sighted in the area. There are spectacular views as you wind your way back to Mammoth.
Trailhead: Clematis Gulch between Liberty Cap and the stone house (Judge's house)
Distance: 5 mile (8 km) loop. Level of Difficulty: Moderate"

Forces of the Northern Range 1L
.7 miles. 0' elevation change

Grebe Lake, and Cascade Lake
Trailhead: 3.5 miles east of Norris on the Norris-Canyon road
Distance: 0.3 miles (0.5 km)
Level of Difficulty: Easy, handicapped accessible backcountry site on lake, may need assistance to reach lake due to some terrain level change

Cygnet Lakes Trail - Per NPS, "This trail travels through intermittently burned lodgepole pine forest and past small marshy ephemeral ponds to the lush meadows surrounding Cygnet Lakes (small and boggy). Day use only! Trail not maintained beyond Cygnet Lakes. Trailhead: Pullout on south side of Norris-Canyon road approximately 5.5 miles west of Canyon Junction. Distance: 8 miles (14.4 km) roundtrip. Level of Difficulty: Easy"

Harlequin Lake 1M
1 miles. 100' elevation change.
Per NPS, This is a gentle ascent through burned lodgepole pines to a small, marshy lake popular with mosquitos and waterfowl (but not harlequin ducks).
Trailhead:1.5 miles west of Madison Campground on the West Entrance road
Distance: 1 mile (1 km) roundtrip
Level of Difficulty: Easy

Two Ribbons Trail
This is a completely boardwalked trail that winds through burned lodgepole pine and sagebrush communities next to the Madison River. Good examples of fire recovery and regrowth as well as buffalo wallows.
Trailhead: Approximately 5 miles east of the West Entrance, no marked trailhead, look for wayside exhibits next to boardwalk in large pull-outs
Distance: Approximately 1.5 miles (2 km) roundtrip
Level of Difficulty: Easy, mostly accessible

YouTube: NPS Norris Geyser Basin - What Happened (3:45)

YouTube: NPS Norris Geyser Basin(2:08)

YouTube: NPS: Golden Gate(1:36)

NE Tower / Canyon Quadrant

YouTube: NPS: Tower/Roosevelt Area (2:03)

YouTube: NPS: Yellowstone's Grand Canyon(2:28)

Trout Lake 1M
1.2 mildew. Wildlife viewing.

Hellroaring Creek 1M
4.0 miles. 450' elevation change.

Yellowstone River Picnic Area 1M
4.0 miles. 400' elevation change. Flowers.

Lost Lake 1M
2.5 - 4.0 miles. 300'-600' elevation change. Flowers.

Tower Falls 1M
1.0 miles. 250' elevation change. Waterfall.

Cascade Lake 1L
5 miles. 0' elevation change. Flowers.
Observation Peak To Tower/Roosevelt Canyon Village
This easy walk allows people with limited time to enjoy open meadows where wild- flowers abound and wildlife is often seen.

YouTube: NPS: The Grand Canyon (2:28)

Canyon Rim South 1L
3.5 miles. 0' elevation change. Notable view. Waterfall.

Canyon Rim North 1L
3.0 miles. 0' elevation change. Notable view. Waterfall.

Ribbon Lake 1L
4.0 miles. 120' elevation change.

Nez Percent (Hayden Valley) 1L

YouTube: NPS: Hayden Valley (2:09)

Sheepeater Cliff / Gardiner River 1L
1 mile. 0' elevation change.

Grebe Lake 2
6 miles. Estimated time: 3–4 hours Difficulty: moderately easy, little vertical rise.
Follows an old fire road through meadows and forest, some of which burned in 1988.

SW Old Faithful Quadrant

YouTube: NPS: Old Faithful Area (1:59)

YouTube: NPS: Why Old Faithful is famous(1:36)

Sentinel Meadows 1L
2.8 miles. 40' elevation change. Geysers.

Mystic Falls 1M
4.0 miles. 150-540' elevation change. Geysers. Waterfall.

Fairy Falls 1L
3.2 miles. 0' elevation change. Geysers. Waterfall.

Upper Geyser Basin 1L
1.5-5 miles. 80' elevation change. Geysers.

Lone Star Geyser 1L
4.6 miles. 60' elevation change. Geysers.

Beula Lake 1L
5 miles. 0' elevation change.

Midway Geyser Basin 1L
.5 miles. 40' elevation change. Grand Prismatic Spring.

YouTube: NPS: Midway Geyser Basin (1:44)

Fountain Paint Pots (Lower Geyser Basin) 1L
.5 miles. 0' elevation change.

SE Yellowstone Lake Quadrant

YouTube: NPS: Yellowstone Lake (1:56)

YouTube: NPS: Yellowstone Lake Geology (4:53)

Pelican Creek Nature Trail 1L
1.5miles. 0' elevation change.

Storm Point 1L
1.5 miles. 0' elevation change. Flowers. Wildlife viewing.
Often closed in late spring and early summer due to bear activity. Inquire at the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center about trail closures before hiking.

Natural Bridge 1L
2.5 miles. 100' elevation change.

YouTube: NPS: Natural Bridge Trail (2:11)

West Thumb Geyser Basin 1L
.75 miles. 20' elevation change. Geysers.
Boardwalk trail through a geyser basin of colorful hot springs and dormant lakeshore geysers situated on the shores of Yellowstone Lake.

Shoshone Lake (via DeLacy Creek)
Distance, round trip: 6 miles (10 km) Estimated time: 2–3 hours. Difficulty: easy
Trailhead: 8.8 miles (14 km) west of West Thumb Junction.
Hike along a forest’s edge and through open meadows to the shores of Yellowstone’s largest backcountry lake. Look for sandhill cranes in meadows, moose near shore, and water birds on and near the lake.
Beyond here the trail continues into Yellowstone’s vast backcountry. The dayhike stops here; return by the same route.

Riddle Lake 1L
4.6 miles. 80' elevation change.
May be closed until July 15. Cross the Continental Divide, hike through small mountain meadows and forests to the shores of a little lake. Look for elk in the meadows and for birds near the lake.

Howard Eaton 2 L-M
7 miles. Often closed due to bear activity. Inquire at the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center before hiking.

DeLacy Creek Trail 2L
6 miles. 0 elevation change.

Pelican Valley 2M
6.8 miles.
Many restrictions apply to this trail because it is in prime grizzly bear habitat:• Closed until July 4th. Day-useonly,9am–7pm. Group of four or more hikers recommended.

Planning to Visit Yellowstone

YouTube: NPS: When to Visit Yellowstone (3:57)

YouTube: NPS: Lodging (7:14)

YouTube: NPS: Camping in Yellowstone (5:13)

YouTube: NPS: Places to Eat (3:35)

Menus and more information about lodging, restaurants, guided tours, and other activities

Yellowstone in Depth

Overview

YouTube: World from Above: Yellowstone (25:26)

YouTube: 58 National Parks: Yellowstone (34:36)

YouTube: BBS: Yellowstone's Microworlds (27:52)

YouTube: Palomar College: Yellowstone Ecosystem (28:52)

YouTube: Finley Holidays: Yellowstone Highlights (4:11)

YouTube: BBS: Yellowstone Autmun (49:02)

Yellowstone in Depth - History

YouTube: National Park Service: History of Yellowstone (2:04)

YouTube: National Park Service; History of the Roosevelt Arch (1:37)

YouTube: National Park Service: History of Fort Yellowstone (2:01)

YouTube: National Park Service: Wild Fires (2:10)

YouTube: NPS: Old Gardiner Road (2:21)

YpuTube: NPS: Where's the Volcano (1:55)

Yellowstone in Depth: Thermal Features

YouTube: BBHC: New Views of Thermal Features (42:35)

YouTube: National Park Service: The Sleeping Giant (5:56)

YouTube: BBC: Super Volcano (56:52)

YouTube: History: How the Earth Was Made- Yellowstone (44:59)

YouTube: Mega Disasters: Yellowstone Eruption (45:02)

YouTube: Discovery Channel: Yellowstone - Super Volcano (2:16)

YouTube: NPS: Hot Water Ecosystem (1:55)

YouTube: NPS: How Does a Geyser Work (1:28)

Yellowstone In Depth: Wildlife

Nature Kingdom: Yellowstone Scavengers (44:59)

Wild: Yellowstone Battleground (44:30)

Wild Kingdom: Winter Comes to Yellowstone (23:46)

National Park Service: Identifying Black and Brown Bears (4:06)

National Park Service: The History of Bears in Yellowstone (9:30)

National Park Service: Bison (2:12)

National Park Service: Wolves (10:22)

National Park Service: Wolves and Coyotes (2:15)

National Park Service: Impact of Wolves in Yellowstone (2:04)

BBS: Wolf Pack (48:59)

BBHC: The Wolves of Yellowstone - The First 15 Years (1:28:16)

YouTube: Nature Kingdom : In the Valley of the Wolves (52:38)

Driving Through Yellowstone by Money Saving Video

1: Yellowstone Lodge to Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel (1:26:24 - real time)

2: Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel to Roosevelt Lodge (35:48 - real time)

3: Yellowstone's Tower General Store to Canyon Village (28:30 - real time)

4: Yellowstone's Canyon Village to Lake Yellowstone Hotel (30:57 - real time)

5: Lake Yellowstone Hotel to Old Faithful Lodge (68:05 - real time)

Yellowstone Safari by Briczar22

1: Big Foot and Bear Spray (5:17)

2. My First Bison (5:42)

3. Cars and Coyotes(4:37)

4. Grizzles and Moose (7:38)

5. Bison Crossing and Coyote Stalking (5:30)

6. More Bison and Wolf People (5:16)

7. Slow People and Fast Pronghorn (6:20)

8. Black Bear and Injured Bison (4:56)

9. Bye Bye Black Bird and a Bear 5:34)

Coyote Hunting (1:08)

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Misc. Notes

Electricity: Campgrounds in Yellowstone do not have electrical hookups, with the exception of the Fishing Bridge RV Park, which prohibits tents.

WIFI is available in Yellowstone as a for-fee service at the lounge at the Mammoth Hotel dining room, Old Faithful Snowlodge, Canyon Lodge, Grant Village lodge buildings and Lake Lodge cafeteria. The service will be available through Global Gossip, with hourly, full day or multi-day rates, payable with a credit card. You may be able to plug in at one of their facilities. You can probably find WIFI service in nearby towns outside the park as well.

Two-Way Radios You may use two way radios as long as those radios do not operate on FCC restricted signals. Many of those radios have a very short range of contact; if the hikes you are planning on taking are over two miles distance you may be better served by setting a time of return rather than using radios.

Cell reception is sporadic in some areas of the park; a strong signal can be found around Old Faithful, Canyon, and Mammoth. Those areas are expanding and in many cases the higher in elevation that you are the better the signal strength.